Events – Danspace Project

February

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March

Photo: Jade Young
Photo: Jade Young

Gemma Bond Dance: HARVEST

Community ACCESS provides subsidized off-season rental opportunities for Danspace Project community members.

HARVEST is an evening of new and reconstructed works by choreographer Gemma Bond, in collaboration with a select group of ten dancers from American Ballet Theatre and New York Theatre Ballet.

The evening’s four works consider the connection between everyday events and the aesthetics of ballet. Bond’s choreography is a study in placing ballet in a less traditional setting—without scenery, without mime and gesture, or a set narrative, but through pure dance creates and inspires emotion that connects with the audience.

“Being a dancer with American Ballet Theatre myself, I’m surrounded by beautiful talent that longs to express itself through new and different avenues. Together we hope to take this great opportunity to explore, create, and bring classical ballet to a new audience in this remarkable location.” – Gemma Bond

The program includes: Being (Music by Karen LeFrak), Manner (Music: Franz Liszt, Six Consolations), Depuis le Jour (Music: Gustave Chapentier, Opera Louise), and Untitled (Music: Alfredo Piatti, Twelve Caprices for cello solo, Op. 25)

Choreography: Gemma Bond
Lighting Design: Serena Wong
Dancers: Zhong-Jing Fang, Thomas Forster, Steven Melendez, Lauren Post, Calvin Royal iii, Jose Sebastian, Christine Shevchenko, Devon Teuscher, Katherine Williams, Stephanie Williams

Gemma Bond got her first taste of choreography at the young age of 13 when she competed in the Royal Ballet’s Sir Kenneth MacMillan Choreographic Competition. She later returned to choreography when she joined American Ballet Theater, in 2008.

From 2010 to the present, Ms Bond has created three new ballets for ABT’s Choreographic Institute, and various new works for New York Theatre Ballet, Intermezzo Ballet Company, and the Hartt School. She choreographed a pas de deux that was performed at the prestigious Eric Bruhn Prize, and a ballet that was performed at the Youth America Grand Prix Gala in 2014. Ms Bond has also worked on commercial projects with 1stAveMachine.

Ms. Bond was awarded the fellowship grant from The New York Choreographic Institute (an affiliate of New York City Ballet) in 2014. With this grant Ms Bond was able to create her new work, The Giving . The Giving is inspired by Shel Silverstein’s, The Giving Tree. Ms Bond took this opportunity to commission original music by Lori Scacco, and used two dancers from American Ballet Theater, Christine Shevchenko and Sterling Baca.

Brother(hood) Dance! by Ricarrdo Valentine
Brother(hood) Dance! by Ricarrdo Valentine

DraftWork: Brother(hood) Dance! / the Median Movement

Curated by Ishmael Houston-Jones, the DraftWork series hosts informal Saturday afternoon performances that offer choreographers an opportunity to show their work in various stages of development.

Performances are followed by discussion and a reception during which artists and audiences share perspectives about the works-in-progress.

The Median Movement is the artistic intersection of Xan Burley + Alex Springer, serving as a vehicle for their collaborative choreography, performance, and teaching. Their work has been presented by Movement Research at the Judson Church, Center for Performance Research, Gowanus Art + Production, MATA Interval at the Museum of the Moving Image, the 92Y, University Settlement, DANCE NOW, the TANK, Triskelion Arts, and BAX, among other venues. They have been commissioned artists at various universities and companies throughout the U.S. Xan, has been fortunate to work with Nancy Bannon, Daniel Charon, Shannon Gillen, Shannon Hummel/Cora Dance, Donnell Oakley, and Tami Stronach, among others. She joined Doug Varone and Dancers in 2012 and acts as co-producer of WAXworks. Alex, originally from Michigan, joined Doug Varone and Dancers in 2008 and acts as the rehearsal director. He has performed with Donnell Oakley, Amy Chavasse, Alexandra Beller, and the Metropolitan Opera Ballet. Alex freelances as a video artist for A.O.Pro(+ductions).  www.themedianmovement.com

Brother(hood) Dance! is a collective formed in April 2014 as a duo that research, create and perform dances of freedom by Orlando Zane Hunter, Jr. and Ricarrdo Valentine. As a collective, we debuted in a non-traditional space of a Brooklyn Brownstone living room. The collective has performed at FiveMyles, Center for Performance Research, JACK, Dixon Place, Open Season at the Urban Justice League, VCU-The Grace Street Theater, Bronx Academy of Arts and Dance (B.A.A.D), Denmark Arts Center among other venues. Ricarrdo and Orlando are in the 2015-16 Dancing While Black Fellowship. They will be sharing their work-in-process solos’ in March at the Brooklyn Arts Exchange.

Still from Eiko & Koma and James Byrne, "UNDERTOW," 1988
Still from Eiko & Koma and James Byrne, "UNDERTOW," 1988

Film Series at Anthology Film Archives: PROGRAM 1: A BODY IN MOURNING:
PROGRAM 1: A BODY IN MOURNING

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

This Wednesday night film series is co-presented by Danspace Project and Anthology Film Archives and curated by Eiko, who addresses “how humans contribute to and survive the characteristics of places.” Tickets are available at Anthology’s box office on the day of the show only. The box office opens 30 minutes before the first show of the day. There are no advance ticket sales.

PROGRAM 1: A BODY IN MOURNING
I grew up in post-war Japan, devouring the works of those who experienced WWII. Popular entertainment, from movies to manga, were also suffused with memories of the War. Without experiencing the War, our generation were influenced by the grotesqueness of massive violence. Soon after 9/11, I began thinking about how dying in mass violence is different from dying from a disease or an accident. Why does it matter how we die? Then I realized that, however painful the process of dying, one who dies a personal death at least dies his or her own death. A personal death receives personal attention. Dying in the midst of massive violence means dying with great upset of many. Massive violence deprives a person his or her own personal death. –Eiko

Kon Ichikawa
THE BURMESE HARP
1956, 116 min, 16mm, b&w. In Japanese with English subtitles.

Mizushima, the protagonist of THE BURMESE HARP witnesses countless corpses as he wanders through Burma. Fear, remorse, and hesitation gradually transform this survivor into a mourner. Wishing to attend and bury the dead, he ultimately tells himself, “I cannot return to Japan.” Film director Ichikawa described THE BURMESE HARP as the first film he felt a profound need to make. –Eiko

With:
Eiko & Koma and James Byrne UNDERTOW 1988, 7 min, 16mm b&w
UNDERTOW is a work choreographed for the camera in collaboration with video artist James Byrne. Eiko & Koma’s two naked bodies float in the space of an existential limbo. –Eiko

More info:
anthologyfilmarchives.org
eikoandkoma.org

 

Photo: William Johnston

Delicious Movement Workshop: Taught by Eiko with special guest Emmanuelle Huynh

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

This class will be taught by Eiko with special guest Emmanuelle Huynh.

Eiko has taught “Delicious Movement” at festivals, universities and arts centers for more than three decades and has influenced generations of dancers and choreographers all over the country.

Every Wednesday (February 17, 24 March 2, 9, 16) during the Platform, from 11:30am-1:30pm, Eiko will teach her signature workshop which is open to all people (not just dancers!), all ages and all abilities. All are encouraged to experience Eiko’s simple but richly nuanced movement vocabulary.

Individuals may sign up for one or multiple workshops.

Observers welcome!


DELICIOUS MOVEMENT MANIFESTO

1. Move to rest, sleep, and dream.

2. Move to pass time, bloom, and linger.

3. Move to taste and share.

4. Move to forget and remember.

[read the full manifesto on eikoandkoma.org]

Emmauelle Huynh and Eiko Otake, Thalie Art Foundation, Brussels, May 2015
Emmauelle Huynh and Eiko Otake, Thalie Art Foundation, Brussels, May 2015

Talking Duets: #1

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

With: Eiko, David Brick, Emmanuelle Huynh, John Kelly, Bebe Miller, Moderator: Judy Hussie-Taylor

First developed during LMCC’s River to River Festival last summer by Eiko and French choreographer Emmanuelle Huynh, Talking Duets was a playful structured improvisational score created and performed by Huynh and Eiko with Hussie-Taylor as the time-keeper and moderator.

These iterations include a diverse range of artists. Eiko and invited guests perform experimental duets, moving and speaking.

Other performances

Photos via badlandsunlimited.com
Photos via badlandsunlimited.com

An Evening with Paul Chan & Claudia La Rocco

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

Platform curators Judy Hussie-Taylor, Lydia Bell, and Eiko have invited artists from other disciplines to respond to three of Eiko’s artistic concerns: 1) the relationship of a body to a place; 2) artist as wanderer; 3) how we bear witness to change. The guests’ artistic responses are presented alongside Eiko’s Church Installation.

5:30pm – Doors open for Installation by Eiko
Eiko will install images, objects, and videos of past performances on Tuesday evenings throughout the Platform. The installation will accumulate, and evolve weekly. Lighting created in collaboration with Kathy Kaufmann.

7pm – An Evening with Paul Chan & Claudia La Rocco
Judy Hussie-Taylor has invited writer Claudia La Rocco and visual artist Paul Chan to respond to the above three prompts. La Rocco’s text will unfold over four hours, and Chan’s sculptures, installed specifically for the St. Mark’s sanctuary and shown for the first time in New York, will be exhibited for one night only.

Still from "Kanal"
Still from "Kanal"

Film Series at Anthology Film Archives: PROGRAM 2: BODIES IN WATER

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

This Wednesday night film series is co-presented by Danspace Project and Anthology Film Archives and curated by Eiko, who addresses “how humans contribute to and survive the characteristics of places.” Tickets are available at Anthology’s box office on the day of the show only. The box office opens 30 minutes before the first show of the day. There are no advance ticket sales.

PROGRAM 2: BODIES IN WATER
We all come from water and water courses through our bodies. We are a bubble floating down the river of life to the unknown. Water is both a source of life and a threat. When water becomes a menace to our lives and senses, our existence is truly frightened. –Eiko

Andrzej Wajda
KANAL
1956, 95 min, 35mm, b&w. In Polish with English subtitles.

KANAL follows a near-decimated company of Polish resistance fighters as they make a final effort to escape the encircling Nazis through the sewers of Warsaw. A merciless view of their flight through the putrid waters, KANAL is a story void of glory and nearly void of hope, where the desire for dignity, even survival, becomes faint. Wajda was an important figure for our youth in Japan. When Eiko & Koma performed in the Manggha Museum of Japanese Art and Technology in 2007, founded by Wajda in Krakow, Poland, we had the pleasure of meeting the filmmaker and telling him how his ASHES AND DIAMONDS had had a special meaning for those of us who were student fighters in the political movements of the late ‘60s. His KANAL inspired Koma and me in 1989 to create the work, CANAL, a work for several naked bodies, whose stage design suggested both urban sewers and the blood stream of a body. –Eiko

With:
Eiko & Koma WALLOW 1984, 19 min, video
WALLOW was our first attempt to create dance for a camera, shot in Point Reyes, California. –Eiko

More info:
anthologyfilmarchives.org
eikoandkoma.org

 

Photo: William Johnston

Delicious Movement Workshop

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

Eiko has taught “Delicious Movement” at festivals, universities and arts centers for more than three decades and has influenced generations of dancers and choreographers all over the country.

Every Wednesday (February 17, 24 March 2, 9, 16) during the Platform, from 11:30am-1:30pm, Eiko will teach her signature workshop which is open to all people (not just dancers!), all ages and all abilities. All are encouraged to experience Eiko’s simple but richly nuanced movement vocabulary.

Individuals may sign up for one or multiple workshops.

Observers welcome!


DELICIOUS MOVEMENT MANIFESTO

1. Move to rest, sleep, and dream.

2. Move to pass time, bloom, and linger.

3. Move to taste and share.

4. Move to forget and remember.

[read the full manifesto on eikoandkoma.org]

Photo: William Johnston
Photo: William Johnston

Book Club: Post-War Tokyo

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

Eiko’s Book Club will meet each Thursday evening at Danspace Project in the St. Mark’s Church sanctuary.

RSVP for each week’s book club. Your RSVP will be followed up with readings for the week.

Readings for this week include:

Ango Sakaguchi (1906-1955). “In the Forest Under Cherries in Full Bloom” (1947. P187-205. PDF)
Kenzaburo Oe (b. 1935). “Sheep” (1958. p 167-177 PDF)

Koma. Photo: Ian Douglas.

Precarious #1: Guest Solos:
Guest Solos

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

Eiko with Beth Gill, Neil Greenberg, Koma, Jimena Paz, Polly Motley, Donna Uchizono, and Arturo Vidich.

Invited artists were given a quote by philosopher Judith Butler about grief and mourning as a point of departure. Each artist has selected a place inside St. Mark’s Church and all will perform a solo simultaneously over three hours.

Audiences will be free to move throughout the church with performances occurring both in the sanctuary as well as other locations throughout the building.

Other performances

Top (l-r): William Johnston, Judy Hussie-Taylor; Bottom (l-r): Judy Hussie-Taylor, William Johnston.

A Body in Places: Eiko Solo #1

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

Eiko’s interest is in the East Village’s history as a home for multiple generations of immigrants, activists, artists, outcasts, dancers, musicians, and poets. This history and her own connection to the neighborhood has inspired her to perform one solo every day (Monday – Friday) for small audiences over three weeks at various locations in the East Village.

Audience members will gather at St. Mark’s Church and will be accompanied to a nearby place where Eiko will perform.

Performances will take place at various times during the morning, afternoon and night. Audiences for these intimate performances will range from 10 to 25 people depending on the size of the performance site.

The specific indoor places will not be revealed in advance but will include familiar and unfamiliar places along Second Avenue and near St. Mark’s Church.

Please note: some places have stairs and limited access to restrooms. For more information regarding accessibility please call 212-674-8112.

One final midnight performance will take place on March 19.

Top (l-r): William Johnston, Judy Hussie-Taylor; Bottom (l-r): Judy Hussie-Taylor, William Johnston.

A Body in Places: Eiko Solo #2

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

Eiko’s interest is in the East Village’s history as a home for multiple generations of immigrants, activists, artists, outcasts, dancers, musicians, and poets. This history and her own connection to the neighborhood has inspired her to perform one solo every day (Monday – Friday) for small audiences over three weeks at various locations in the East Village.

Audience members will gather at St. Mark’s Church and will be accompanied to a nearby place where Eiko will perform.

Performances will take place at various times during the morning, afternoon and night. Audiences for these intimate performances will range from 10 to 25 people depending on the size of the performance site.

The specific indoor places will not be revealed in advance but will include familiar and unfamiliar places along Second Avenue and near St. Mark’s Church.

Please note: some places have stairs and limited access to restrooms. For more information regarding accessibility please call 212-674-8112.

One final midnight performance will take place on March 19.

Poetry_web

An Evening with The Poetry Project

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

5:30pm – Doors open for Installation by Eiko
Eiko will install images, objects, and videos of past performances on Tuesday evenings throughout the Platform. The installation will accumulate, and evolve weekly. Lighting created in collaboration with Kathy Kaufmann.

7pm – An Evening with The Poetry Project
Readers include: Forrest GanderJibade-Khalil Huffman, Robert Kocik, Tonya Foster, and Stacy Szymaszek.

Co-presented by Danspace Project and The Poetry Project, this evening is inspired by Eiko’s citing of Allen Ginsberg as a major influence on her work and this Platform.

Still from "Naked Island"
Still from "Naked Island"

Film Series at Anthology Film Archives PROGRAM 3: BODIES ON AN ISLAND

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

This Wednesday night film series is co-presented by Danspace Project and Anthology Film Archives and curated by Eiko, who addresses “how humans contribute to and survive the characteristics of places.” Tickets are available at Anthology’s box office on the day of the show only. The box office opens 30 minutes before the first show of the day. There are no advance ticket sales.

PROGRAM 3: BODIES ON AN ISLAND
Nakedness is my life-long theme: artistically, physically, and metaphorically. THE NAKED ISLAND depicts the life of a family on a small island that barely provides them with the means for subsistence. Like THE NAKED ISLAND, Eiko & Koma’s “living installations” are place-based works. In a gallery, we create another place where we exist and move as inhabitants. –Eiko

Kaneto Shindo
THE NAKED ISLAND
1960, 96 min, 35mm, b&w. In Japanese with English subtitles.

The poetic, dialogue-free THE NAKED ISLAND is one of my favorite films. Shindo created the first Japanese independent film production company in 1950 and never returned to mainstream productions throughout his career, which lasted until his death in 2012 at the age of 100. THE NAKED ISLAND is a model of low budget filmmaking. The minimal cast and crew all camped out at the location, sharing all the necessary labor. This method, which Shindo adhered to for most of his career, deeply influenced generations of Japanese independent filmmakers. EIko & Koma ahs also taken the same path. Shot on Sukun-jima in the gentle Seto Inland Sea, NAKED ISLAND seems at first like a fable but its description of the surrounding society is in fact a realistic one. –Eiko

With:
Eiko & Koma HUSK 1987, 9 min, 16mm
HUSK is my solo; Koma was on camera. We wanted to create a dance poem of an unnamed body in an unnamed place. The choreography of both body and camera was created to make an unedited media work. –Eiko

More info:
anthologyfilmarchives.org
eikoandkoma.org

 

Top (l-r): William Johnston, Judy Hussie-Taylor; Bottom (l-r): Judy Hussie-Taylor, William Johnston.

A Body in Places: Eiko Solo #3

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

Eiko’s interest is in the East Village’s history as a home for multiple generations of immigrants, activists, artists, outcasts, dancers, musicians, and poets. This history and her own connection to the neighborhood has inspired her to perform one solo every day (Monday – Friday) for small audiences over three weeks at various locations in the East Village.

Audience members will gather at St. Mark’s Church and will be accompanied to a nearby place where Eiko will perform.

Performances will take place at various times during the morning, afternoon and night. Audiences for these intimate performances will range from 10 to 25 people depending on the size of the performance site.

The specific indoor places will not be revealed in advance but will include familiar and unfamiliar places along Second Avenue and near St. Mark’s Church.

Please note: some places have stairs and limited access to restrooms. For more information regarding accessibility please call 212-674-8112.

One final midnight performance will take place on March 19.

Photo: William Johnston

Delicious Movement Workshop

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

Eiko has taught “Delicious Movement” at festivals, universities and arts centers for more than three decades and has influenced generations of dancers and choreographers all over the country.

Every Wednesday (February 17, 24 March 2, 9, 16) during the Platform, from 11:30am-1:30pm, Eiko will teach her signature workshop which is open to all people (not just dancers!), all ages and all abilities. All are encouraged to experience Eiko’s simple but richly nuanced movement vocabulary.

Individuals may sign up for one or multiple workshops.

Observers welcome!


DELICIOUS MOVEMENT MANIFESTO

1. Move to rest, sleep, and dream.

2. Move to pass time, bloom, and linger.

3. Move to taste and share.

4. Move to forget and remember.

[read the full manifesto on eikoandkoma.org]

Top (l-r): William Johnston, Judy Hussie-Taylor; Bottom (l-r): Judy Hussie-Taylor, William Johnston.

A Body in Places: Eiko Solo #4

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

Eiko’s interest is in the East Village’s history as a home for multiple generations of immigrants, activists, artists, outcasts, dancers, musicians, and poets. This history and her own connection to the neighborhood has inspired her to perform one solo every day (Monday – Friday) for small audiences over three weeks at various locations in the East Village.

Audience members will gather at St. Mark’s Church and will be accompanied to a nearby place where Eiko will perform.

Performances will take place at various times during the morning, afternoon and night. Audiences for these intimate performances will range from 10 to 25 people depending on the size of the performance site.

The specific indoor places will not be revealed in advance but will include familiar and unfamiliar places along Second Avenue and near St. Mark’s Church.

Please note: some places have stairs and limited access to restrooms. For more information regarding accessibility please call 212-674-8112.

One final midnight performance will take place on March 19.

Photo: William Johnston

Book Club: HIROSHIMA and NAGASAKI

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

Eiko’s Book Club will meet each Thursday evening at Danspace Project in the St. Mark’s Church sanctuary.

RSVP for each week’s book club. Your RSVP will be followed up with readings for the week.

Readings this week include:

Kyoko Hayashi (b. 1930) “The place of the Festival” by Kyoko Hayashi (1975. 37 p. PDF)
Kenzaburo Oe (b. 1935) “Hiroshima Notes” (1965. 38P PDF)

Top (l-r): William Johnston, Judy Hussie-Taylor; Bottom (l-r): Judy Hussie-Taylor, William Johnston.

A Body in Places: Eiko Solo #5

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

Eiko’s interest is in the East Village’s history as a home for multiple generations of immigrants, activists, artists, outcasts, dancers, musicians, and poets. This history and her own connection to the neighborhood has inspired her to perform one solo every day (Monday – Friday) for small audiences over three weeks at various locations in the East Village.

Audience members will gather at St. Mark’s Church and will be accompanied to a nearby place where Eiko will perform.

Performances will take place at various times during the morning, afternoon and night. Audiences for these intimate performances will range from 10 to 25 people depending on the size of the performance site.

The specific indoor places will not be revealed in advance but will include familiar and unfamiliar places along Second Avenue and near St. Mark’s Church.

Please note: some places have stairs and limited access to restrooms. For more information regarding accessibility please call 212-674-8112.

One final midnight performance will take place on March 19.

Koma. Photo: Ian Douglas.
Koma. Photo: Ian Douglas.

Precarious #2: Guest Solos:
Guest Solos

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

Eiko with Michelle Boulé, Beth Gill, Neil Greenberg, Koma, Jimena Paz, Arturo Vidich, and Geo Wyeth.

Invited artists were given a quote by philosopher Judith Butler about grief and mourning as a point of departure. Each artist has selected a place inside St. Mark’s Church and all will perform a solo simultaneously over three hours.

Audiences will be free to move throughout the church with performances occurring both in the sanctuary as well as other locations throughout the building.

Other performances

Top (l-r): William Johnston, Judy Hussie-Taylor; Bottom (l-r): Judy Hussie-Taylor, William Johnston.

A Body in Places: Eiko Solo #6

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

Eiko’s interest is in the East Village’s history as a home for multiple generations of immigrants, activists, artists, outcasts, dancers, musicians, and poets. This history and her own connection to the neighborhood has inspired her to perform one solo every day (Monday – Friday) for small audiences over three weeks at various locations in the East Village.

Audience members will gather at St. Mark’s Church and will be accompanied to a nearby place where Eiko will perform.

Performances will take place at various times during the morning, afternoon and night. Audiences for these intimate performances will range from 10 to 25 people depending on the size of the performance site.

The specific indoor places will not be revealed in advance but will include familiar and unfamiliar places along Second Avenue and near St. Mark’s Church.

Please note: some places have stairs and limited access to restrooms. For more information regarding accessibility please call 212-674-8112.

One final midnight performance will take place on March 19.

Top (l-r): William Johnston, Judy Hussie-Taylor; Bottom (l-r): Judy Hussie-Taylor, William Johnston.

A Body in Places: Eiko Solo #7

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

Eiko’s interest is in the East Village’s history as a home for multiple generations of immigrants, activists, artists, outcasts, dancers, musicians, and poets. This history and her own connection to the neighborhood has inspired her to perform one solo every day (Monday – Friday) for small audiences over three weeks at various locations in the East Village.

Audience members will gather at St. Mark’s Church and will be accompanied to a nearby place where Eiko will perform.

Performances will take place at various times during the morning, afternoon and night. Audiences for these intimate performances will range from 10 to 25 people depending on the size of the performance site.

The specific indoor places will not be revealed in advance but will include familiar and unfamiliar places along Second Avenue and near St. Mark’s Church.

Please note: some places have stairs and limited access to restrooms. For more information regarding accessibility please call 212-674-8112.

One final midnight performance will take place on March 19.

Photo: Krista Schlueter
Photo: Krista Schlueter

An Evening with DonChristian

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

Platform curators Judy Hussie-Taylor, Lydia Bell, and Eiko have invited artists from other disciplines to respond to three of Eiko’s artistic concerns: 1) the relationship of a body to a place; 2) artist as wanderer; 3) how we bear witness to change. The guests’ artistic responses are presented alongside Eiko’s Church Installation.

5:30pm – Doors open for Installation by Eiko
Eiko will install images, objects, and videos of past performances on Tuesday evenings throughout the Platform. The installation will accumulate, and evolve weekly. Lighting created in collaboration with Kathy Kaufmann.

7pm – An Evening with DonChristian
Lydia Bell and guest curator Shin Otake have invited rapper, R&B singer, and painter DonChristian to respond in words and music to Eiko’s work. Jones’ performance will be followed by a conversation with Jones and Eiko about the role of performance in addressing violence, anger, and identity.

Still from "Minamata"
Still from "Minamata"

Film Series at Anthology Film Archives: PROGRAM 4: BODIES IN MINAMATA

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

This Wednesday night film series is co-presented by Danspace Project and Anthology Film Archives and curated by Eiko, who addresses “how humans contribute to and survive the characteristics of places.” Tickets are available at Anthology’s box office on the day of the show only. The box office opens 30 minutes before the first show of the day. There are no advance ticket sales.

PROGRAM 4: BODIES IN MINAMATA

Noriaki Tsuchimoto
MINAMATA: THE VICTIMS AND THEIR WORLD
1971, 120 min, 16mm. In Japanese with English subtitles. This screening is co-organized by The Japan Foundation.
I grew up in postwar, post-occupation Japan, an era of rapid economic growth accompanied by pollution and environmental hazards. It was clear that corporations did not care for much besides profit. Minamata is a city in southern Japan that gave its name to a fatal disease caused by the most notorious environmental hazard in Japan’s history. Fishermen, their families, and their pets were the first victims to suffer from methylmercury poisoning by eating fish harvested from the sea that, for 36 years, was contaminated by a fertilizer factory. The victims’ anger and their efforts to create normalcy within their abnormal situation deliver a deep sense of urgency. That urgency also manifested in other resistance movements, which affected the ways in which some of my own generation thought of the world and learned ways to live and fight. –Eiko

With:
Eiko & Koma and James Byrne LAMENT 1985, 9 min, 16mm
We collaborated with James Byrne to create LAMENT in the mid-1980s when I saw many colleagues and friends become sick and die of AIDS. To live is to witness the suffering of others, and to see the wrongs of the society that creates this suffering. To acknowledge this suffering and to maintain mourning for it is to willfully refuse to forget. –Eiko

More info:
anthologyfilmarchives.org
eikoandkoma.org

 

Top (l-r): William Johnston, Judy Hussie-Taylor; Bottom (l-r): Judy Hussie-Taylor, William Johnston.

A Body in Places: Eiko Solo #8

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

Eiko’s interest is in the East Village’s history as a home for multiple generations of immigrants, activists, artists, outcasts, dancers, musicians, and poets. This history and her own connection to the neighborhood has inspired her to perform one solo every day (Monday – Friday) for small audiences over three weeks at various locations in the East Village.

Audience members will gather at St. Mark’s Church and will be accompanied to a nearby place where Eiko will perform.

Performances will take place at various times during the morning, afternoon and night. Audiences for these intimate performances will range from 10 to 25 people depending on the size of the performance site.

The specific indoor places will not be revealed in advance but will include familiar and unfamiliar places along Second Avenue and near St. Mark’s Church.

Please note: some places have stairs and limited access to restrooms. For more information regarding accessibility please call 212-674-8112.

One final midnight performance will take place on March 19.

Photo: William Johnston

Delicious Movement Workshop

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

Eiko has taught “Delicious Movement” at festivals, universities and arts centers for more than three decades and has influenced generations of dancers and choreographers all over the country.

Every Wednesday (February 17, 24 March 2, 9, 16) during the Platform, from 11:30am-1:30pm, Eiko will teach her signature workshop which is open to all people (not just dancers!), all ages and all abilities. All are encouraged to experience Eiko’s simple but richly nuanced movement vocabulary.

Individuals may sign up for one or multiple workshops.

Observers welcome!


DELICIOUS MOVEMENT MANIFESTO

1. Move to rest, sleep, and dream.

2. Move to pass time, bloom, and linger.

3. Move to taste and share.

4. Move to forget and remember.

[read the full manifesto on eikoandkoma.org]

Top (l-r): William Johnston, Judy Hussie-Taylor; Bottom (l-r): Judy Hussie-Taylor, William Johnston.

A Body in Places: Eiko Solo #9

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

Eiko’s interest is in the East Village’s history as a home for multiple generations of immigrants, activists, artists, outcasts, dancers, musicians, and poets. This history and her own connection to the neighborhood has inspired her to perform one solo every day (Monday – Friday) for small audiences over three weeks at various locations in the East Village.

Audience members will gather at St. Mark’s Church and will be accompanied to a nearby place where Eiko will perform.

Performances will take place at various times during the morning, afternoon and night. Audiences for these intimate performances will range from 10 to 25 people depending on the size of the performance site.

The specific indoor places will not be revealed in advance but will include familiar and unfamiliar places along Second Avenue and near St. Mark’s Church.

Please note: some places have stairs and limited access to restrooms. For more information regarding accessibility please call 212-674-8112.

One final midnight performance will take place on March 19.

Photo: William Johnston

Book Club: MINAMATA and FUKUSHIMA

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

Eiko’s Book Club will meet each Thursday evening at Danspace Project in the St. Mark’s Church sanctuary.

RSVP for each week’s book club. Your RSVP will be followed up with readings for the week.

Readings for this week include:

Michiko Ishimure (b. 1927). Paradise in the Sea of Sorrow: Our Minamata Disease (1969. p3-63.PDF)
Kenzaburo Oe (b. 1935) “History repeats,” The New Yorker, March 28, 2011 New Yorker (2011)
Poems from Fukushima. PDF

Eiko in Fukushima, Tomioka, 22 July 2014.  Photo by William Johnston.
Eiko in Fukushima, Tomioka, 22 July 2014. Photo by William Johnston.

After Fukushima: A 24-hour Event

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

March 11 marks the fifth anniversary of the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear disaster in Fukushima. A photo collaboration between Eiko and photographer/historian William Johnston will be on display here in the St. Mark’s Church sanctuary for 24 hours. Singers and poets will mark each hour with a song and poem.

After Fukushima: A 24-hour Event is presented in partnership with Japan Society.

SCHEDULE

4PM–8PM – Conversation Without Walls: Bearing Witness
Scholars and artists gather to commemorate the five-year anniversary of the Fukushima disaster. How are we challenged by mounting human failures? How does being a mover affect our thoughts and sensitivity? And how do our memories affect our movement? How do choreographers concern themselves with changing environments, artistically, politically and socially?  RSVP here

4-5pm:
Presenters: Marilyn Ivy & William Johnston 
Respondents: Gabriel Florenz, Harry Philbrick, Julie Malnig

5-6pm:
Presenters: Karen Shimakawa & Ana Janevski 
Respondents: Debra Levine, luciana achugar

6-7pm:
Presenters: Yoshiko Chuma & Katja Kolcio
Respondents: Koosil-ja, Wendy Perron

 

9PM –  A Body in Places: Eiko Solo #10 at St. Mark’s Church, with a special introduction by Yukie Kamiya, Gallery Director of Japan Society. Tickets here

 

10PM – Installation opens
Singers and poets mark each hour

 

SAT., MARCH 12, 10PM  Installation closes

Top (l-r): William Johnston, Judy Hussie-Taylor; Bottom (l-r): Judy Hussie-Taylor, William Johnston.

A Body in Places: Eiko Solo #10

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

Eiko’s interest is in the East Village’s history as a home for multiple generations of immigrants, activists, artists, outcasts, dancers, musicians, and poets. This history and her own connection to the neighborhood has inspired her to perform one solo every day (Monday – Friday) for small audiences over three weeks at various locations in the East Village.

Audience members will gather at St. Mark’s Church and will be accompanied to a nearby place where Eiko will perform.

Performances will take place at various times during the morning, afternoon and night. Audiences for these intimate performances will range from 10 to 25 people depending on the size of the performance site.

The specific indoor places will not be revealed in advance but will include familiar and unfamiliar places along Second Avenue and near St. Mark’s Church.

Please note: some places have stairs and limited access to restrooms. For more information regarding accessibility please call 212-674-8112.

One final midnight performance will take place on March 19.

Top (l-r): William Johnston, Judy Hussie-Taylor; Bottom (l-r): Judy Hussie-Taylor, William Johnston.

A Body in Places: Eiko Solo #11

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

Eiko’s interest is in the East Village’s history as a home for multiple generations of immigrants, activists, artists, outcasts, dancers, musicians, and poets. This history and her own connection to the neighborhood has inspired her to perform one solo every day (Monday – Friday) for small audiences over three weeks at various locations in the East Village.

Audience members will gather at St. Mark’s Church and will be accompanied to a nearby place where Eiko will perform.

Performances will take place at various times during the morning, afternoon and night. Audiences for these intimate performances will range from 10 to 25 people depending on the size of the performance site.

The specific indoor places will not be revealed in advance but will include familiar and unfamiliar places along Second Avenue and near St. Mark’s Church.

Please note: some places have stairs and limited access to restrooms. For more information regarding accessibility please call 212-674-8112.

One final midnight performance will take place on March 19.

Top (l-r): William Johnston, Judy Hussie-Taylor; Bottom (l-r): Judy Hussie-Taylor, William Johnston.

A Body in Places: Eiko Solo #12

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

Eiko’s interest is in the East Village’s history as a home for multiple generations of immigrants, activists, artists, outcasts, dancers, musicians, and poets. This history and her own connection to the neighborhood has inspired her to perform one solo every day (Monday – Friday) for small audiences over three weeks at various locations in the East Village.

Audience members will gather at St. Mark’s Church and will be accompanied to a nearby place where Eiko will perform.

Performances will take place at various times during the morning, afternoon and night. Audiences for these intimate performances will range from 10 to 25 people depending on the size of the performance site.

The specific indoor places will not be revealed in advance but will include familiar and unfamiliar places along Second Avenue and near St. Mark’s Church.

Please note: some places have stairs and limited access to restrooms. For more information regarding accessibility please call 212-674-8112.

One final midnight performance will take place on March 19.

Photo: Anna Lee Campbell
Photo: Anna Lee Campbell

An Evening with Eiko and Guests

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

Platform curators Judy Hussie-Taylor, Lydia Bell, and Eiko have invited artists from other disciplines to respond to three of Eiko’s artistic concerns: 1) the relationship of a body to a place; 2) artist as wanderer; 3) how we bear witness to change. The guests’ artistic responses are presented alongside Eiko’s Church Installation.

5:30pm – Doors open for Installation by Eiko
Eiko will install images, objects, and videos of past performances on Tuesday evenings throughout the Platform. The installation will accumulate, and evolve weekly. Lighting created in collaboration with Kathy Kaufmann.

7pm – An Evening with Eiko and Guests
Curated by Eiko, this evening is intentionally open so that Eiko can respond to other artists and current events in real time.

 

Other performances

Photo: William Johnston
Photo: William Johnston

Delicious Movement Workshop

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

Eiko has taught “Delicious Movement” at festivals, universities and arts centers for more than three decades and has influenced generations of dancers and choreographers all over the country.

Every Wednesday (February 17, 24 March 2, 9, 16) during the Platform, from 11:30am-1:30pm, Eiko will teach her signature workshop which is open to all people (not just dancers!), all ages and all abilities. All are encouraged to experience Eiko’s simple but richly nuanced movement vocabulary.

Individuals may sign up for one or multiple workshops.

Observers welcome!


DELICIOUS MOVEMENT MANIFESTO

1. Move to rest, sleep, and dream.

2. Move to pass time, bloom, and linger.

3. Move to taste and share.

4. Move to forget and remember.

[read the full manifesto on eikoandkoma.org]

Still from "The Spirit Moves"
Still from "The Spirit Moves"

Film Series at Anthology Film Archives: PROGRAM 5: BODIES IN A CROWD

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

This Wednesday night film series is co-presented by Danspace Project and Anthology Film Archives and curated by Eiko, who addresses “how humans contribute to and survive the characteristics of places.” Tickets are available at Anthology’s box office on the day of the show only. The box office opens 30 minutes before the first show of the day. There are no advance ticket sales.

PROGRAM 5: BODIES IN A CROWD

I met Mura Dehn by accident soon after Koma and I arrived in New York. Surprised by how little sense of rhythm I have as a dancer, Mura offered to teach me her “compromised version of jazz dance for Eiko.” It is a quintessentially New York story of how two young Japanese artists in their 20s ended up inheriting from an old Russian Jewish friend the wealth of African American people dancing their hearts out in the Savoy Ballroom of pre-war Harlem. In the sea of African Americans, Mura was often the only white person dancing. She said the entire Savoy was bustling with dancing energy. One dancer in her film says, “Spirit moves me. When spirit leaves me I stop dancing.” –Eiko

Mura Dehn
THE SPIRIT MOVES: A HISTORY OF BLACK SOCIAL DANCE ON FILM
1987, 119 min, 16mm
Dehn, born and first trained in dance in Russia, moved to Europe to study at the Isadora Duncan School. Later she studied jazz and immigrated to the US in 1930. She found the most exciting jazz dancing at the Savoy Ballroom in Harlem. First as a dancer, then as a filmmaker, she immersed herself among the most brilliant African American dancers. Her magisterial, three-part documentary features her own narration. –Eiko

With:
Eiko Otake A BODY IN A STATION 2015, 15 min, digital
An excerpt from Eiko’s performance at Fulton Center in Lower Manhattan in June 2015. Camera by Alexis Moh; edited by Alexis Moh with Eiko.

 

More info:
anthologyfilmarchives.org
eikoandkoma.org

Top (l-r): William Johnston, Judy Hussie-Taylor; Bottom (l-r): Judy Hussie-Taylor, William Johnston.

A Body in Places: Eiko Solo #13

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

Eiko’s interest is in the East Village’s history as a home for multiple generations of immigrants, activists, artists, outcasts, dancers, musicians, and poets. This history and her own connection to the neighborhood has inspired her to perform one solo every day (Monday – Friday) for small audiences over three weeks at various locations in the East Village.

Audience members will gather at St. Mark’s Church and will be accompanied to a nearby place where Eiko will perform.

Performances will take place at various times during the morning, afternoon and night. Audiences for these intimate performances will range from 10 to 25 people depending on the size of the performance site.

The specific indoor places will not be revealed in advance but will include familiar and unfamiliar places along Second Avenue and near St. Mark’s Church.

Please note: some places have stairs and limited access to restrooms. For more information regarding accessibility please call 212-674-8112.

One final midnight performance will take place on March 19.

Top (l-r): William Johnston, Judy Hussie-Taylor; Bottom (l-r): Judy Hussie-Taylor, William Johnston.

A Body in Places: Eiko Solo #14

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

Eiko’s interest is in the East Village’s history as a home for multiple generations of immigrants, activists, artists, outcasts, dancers, musicians, and poets. This history and her own connection to the neighborhood has inspired her to perform one solo every day (Monday – Friday) for small audiences over three weeks at various locations in the East Village.

Audience members will gather at St. Mark’s Church and will be accompanied to a nearby place where Eiko will perform.

Performances will take place at various times during the morning, afternoon and night. Audiences for these intimate performances will range from 10 to 25 people depending on the size of the performance site.

The specific indoor places will not be revealed in advance but will include familiar and unfamiliar places along Second Avenue and near St. Mark’s Church.

Please note: some places have stairs and limited access to restrooms. For more information regarding accessibility please call 212-674-8112.

One final midnight performance will take place on March 19.

Photo: William Johnston

Book Club: AMERICA

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

Eiko’s Book Club will meet each Thursday evening at Danspace Project in the St. Mark’s Church sanctuary.

RSVP for each week’s book club. Your RSVP will be followed up with readings for the week.

Readings for this week include:

Eiko Otake “Kyoko Hayashi Writes in Sustained Mourning”
Kyoko Hayashi “From Trinity to Trinity” (1999) translated by Eiko
C.D. Wright poems
Allen Ginsberg poems

Top (l-r): William Johnston, Judy Hussie-Taylor; Bottom (l-r): Judy Hussie-Taylor, William Johnston.

A Body in Places: Eiko Solo #15

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

Eiko’s interest is in the East Village’s history as a home for multiple generations of immigrants, activists, artists, outcasts, dancers, musicians, and poets. This history and her own connection to the neighborhood has inspired her to perform one solo every day (Monday – Friday) for small audiences over three weeks at various locations in the East Village.

Audience members will gather at St. Mark’s Church and will be accompanied to a nearby place where Eiko will perform.

Performances will take place at various times during the morning, afternoon and night. Audiences for these intimate performances will range from 10 to 25 people depending on the size of the performance site.

The specific indoor places will not be revealed in advance but will include familiar and unfamiliar places along Second Avenue and near St. Mark’s Church.

Please note: some places have stairs and limited access to restrooms. For more information regarding accessibility please call 212-674-8112.

One final midnight performance will take place on March 19.

Top (l-r): William Johnston, Judy Hussie-Taylor; Bottom (l-r): Judy Hussie-Taylor, William Johnston.
Top (l-r): William Johnston, Judy Hussie-Taylor; Bottom (l-r): Judy Hussie-Taylor, William Johnston.

A Body in Places: Eiko Solo #16

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

Eiko’s interest is in the East Village’s history as a home for multiple generations of immigrants, activists, artists, outcasts, dancers, musicians, and poets. This history and her own connection to the neighborhood has inspired her to perform one solo every day (Monday – Friday) for small audiences over three weeks at various locations in the East Village.

Audience members will gather at St. Mark’s Church and will be accompanied to a nearby place where Eiko will perform.

Performances will take place at various times during the morning, afternoon and night. Audiences for these intimate performances will range from 10 to 25 people depending on the size of the performance site.

The specific indoor places will not be revealed in advance but will include familiar and unfamiliar places along Second Avenue and near St. Mark’s Church.

Please note: some places have stairs and limited access to restrooms. For more information regarding accessibility please call 212-674-8112.

Emmauelle Huynh and Eiko Otake, Thalie Art Foundation, Brussels, May 2015

Talking Duets: #2:
#2

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

With: Eiko, David Brick, Ishmael Houston-Jones, Yvonne Meier, Elizabeth Streb, Moderator: Laura Flanders

First developed during LMCC’s River to River Festival last summer by Eiko and French choreographer Emmanuelle Huynh, Talking Duets was a playful structured improvisational score created and performed by Huynh and Eiko with Hussie-Taylor as the time-keeper and moderator.

These iterations will include experimental duets by a diverse range of artists. Eiko and invited guests perform experimental duets, moving and speaking.

Other performances

Poster for the gala performance "Hyakkaryouran" to celebrate Kazuo's centenary. Kanagawa Prefectural Seishonen Centre Hall. Photo by Yoshihiko Ueda
Designed by Ryohei Hashimoto. www.kazuoohnodancestudio.com
Poster for the gala performance "Hyakkaryouran" to celebrate Kazuo's centenary. Kanagawa Prefectural Seishonen Centre Hall. Photo by Yoshihiko Ueda Designed by Ryohei Hashimoto. www.kazuoohnodancestudio.com

Film Series at Anthology Film Archives: PROGRAM 6: A BODY IN A CHAIR: BODIES AWAKE

Part of Platform 2016: A Body in Places

Eiko and John Killacky will be in attendance to introduce this screening!

This Wednesday night film series is co-presented by Danspace Project and Anthology Film Archives and curated by Eiko, who addresses “how humans contribute to and survive the characteristics of places.” Tickets are available at Anthology’s box office on the day of the show only. The box office opens 30 minutes before the first show of the day. There are no advance ticket sales.

PROGRAM 6: A BODY IN A CHAIR: BODIES AWAKE
I have long felt that dance does not belong only to the young, healthy, and athletic. Here are some clear examples of old and challenged bodies dancing in mourning of the lost. –Eiko

Otsu Koshiro
INNER MONOLOGUE
2005, 100 min, digital. In Japanese with English subtitles.
I studied with Butoh’s founder Kazuo Ohno in 1971-72 and again in 1975-76. He was always disappointed by my leaving for faraway places like Europe and the US. Having spent nine years in the War, Ohno, upon his return, danced with urgency, perhaps also with remorse. In 1977, at the age of 70, he danced La Argentina, his homage to famed Spanish dancer La Argentina, whom he saw in 1929. He performed six seasons in New York, the last in December 1999 at the age of 93, his very final concert abroad. He soon suffered a fall that advanced his Alzheimer’s. However, with the help of his son Yoshito Ohno, he continued to dance on a chair, both in his studio and in the theaters of various cities. Though his memories and steps were lost, his dancing clearly lived on in his body and mind. Ohno danced and murmured, “If I cannot dance, why have I climbed this mountain?” –Eiko

With:
John Killacky and Steve Grandell STOLEN SHADOWS 1996, 10 min, video
John Killacky DREAMING AWAKE 2003, 5 min, video
STOLEN SHADOWS is a black and white film lamenting on the mounting losses from the AIDS pandemic. DREAMING AWAKE juxtaposes a narrator in a wheelchair with the movement of nude dancers. A surgical mishap left Killacky paralyzed. He willed himself to re-learn and train his new body. –Eiko

 

More info:
anthologyfilmarchives.org
eikoandkoma.org